Deforestation at Pysgodlyn Mawr


cardiffgareth

Link Posted 23/05/2022 - 14:38
13 pretty sad images of Pysgodlyn Mawr, a once wonderful forest where we used to take the kids and walk around below is an image I shot in 2017. That would have been taken where now it's all cut down and felled.

2017

Hensol Forest by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

So walking around felt kinda weird and sad. I've been here between then and now but, I don't know, it just felt different today and I felt I wanted to document it and hopefully convey what I was feeling. I think this was done several years ago but it still remains like this which I think is sadder as it felt like 'lets destroy this and leave it'. Clearly there was a reason, maybe the trees were infected, who knows, but seeing as so much time has passed since this part of the forest was annihilated and nothing has been done, nothing replanted etc I question the ethics.

All with the Pentax K1 and either the DFA 24-70mm, DA* 60-250mm or the Irix 15mm

1.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

2.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

3.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

4.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

5.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

6.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

7.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

8.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

9.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

10.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

11.

Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

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Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr

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Pysgodlyn Mawr by Gareth Williams, on Flickr
Gareth
Welsh Photographer

My outfit: K1 gripped - K3ii - two Z-1P - Pentax D FA 24-70mm - Sigma 70-200mm OS HSM - Pentax modified DA* 60-250mm f4 - Irix 15mm Firefly - Pentax FA 35mm - FA 50mm - Sigma EX 20mm - FA 28-70mm f4 - Tamron SP 90mm macro - Pentax AF 540 FGZ II

My Flickr
My PPG
Foundation NFT

RobL

Link Posted 23/05/2022 - 18:47
Is the forest being cleared of commercial timber to make way for indigenous broadleaved trees? That is what is happening locally here (except for HS2 which is demolishing ancient woodland).

Urbanmeister

Link Posted 23/05/2022 - 23:37
I really don't know what to say. RobL makes a good point but if it isn't then... why was this allowed to happen?
Be well, stay safe.

davidwozhere

Link Posted 25/05/2022 - 00:47
It certainly looks like a commercial crop (planted years ago) has finally been harvested. Be interesting to see what is done with the remains.
Both the *istDS and the K5 are incurably addicted to old glass

My page on Photocrowd - link

Lubbyman

Link Posted 25/05/2022 - 09:38
It might well be like that for the long term health of the forest. In a natural forest, some trees would fall from old age every year, swathes of trees would be blown down by storms once in a while etc. Nobody would remove them, it would look a mess in the short term, but it's all part of the great cycle of forest life and necessary for a rich ecosystem. With a managed forest, human intervention is needed to achieve the same. My son-in-law is an ecologist for a water company (not in Wales) and is involved in maintaining and improving habitat in the forested areas owned by the company. Leaving fallen tree trunks and branches or even deliberately putting them there - and stopping contractors with JCBs removing them! - is all part of ecosystem management.

Go back to the same spot in 5 years time then 10 years time and see how it has changed (and post some pics on the forum, of course ). Change takes time, but I wouldn't be surprised if a flourishing ecosystem is already developing that's a lot more varied than when there was an almost solid tree canopy shading the ground - you might need have a macro lens with you, though, to see it in its full glory!

Steve

Lubbyman

Link Posted 25/05/2022 - 10:10
Gareth - you might be interest in this, found by Google. It's minutes of a 2021 meeting to discuss progress against the 2014 'Condition Assessment Report' for ) Pysgodlyn Mawr/Hensol Forest. It includes: "rotational tree felling in the surrounding forest also allowed for further diversity, which gave a positive slant to the devastation experienced as a result of recent felling." ... "NRW are preparing a draft plan for future management of the Forest. Rotational tree felling for timber would continue and management of the lake and a fringe area around would be holistic and integrated to encourage biodiversity.".

It does look like your pictures have captured a small part of the working out of a grand plan that is for the good of the forest.

Steve

redbusa99

Link Posted 25/05/2022 - 12:02
from what i have seen at our local woodland and in the Forest of Dean is that the greatest damage is done by the machinery they use as it destroys all the undergrowth
as well.
odd lens or 2

Flickr
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