Changing lenses


sportyman531

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 16:56
There is no such thing as a dust free atmosphere in a domestic situation so, where and when is it best to change lenses?
I have largely avoided this by having two bodies and two lenses almost permanently attached but now I find I have a growing selection of lenses!
flickr ID: SteveW46243 or sw46246
DA AL 35mm f2.4, K3,18-135 WR, DA 55-300, Pentax KX, K5 x 2, 18-50 50-200 kit lenses, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Fuji X10, 2x Mamiya 1000s 2x 80mm f2.8, 150mm f3.5, 210mm f4, Yashica 124G TLR, 2x Yashica FX3 Super 2000, Tamron 28mm f2.8, 90mm SP f2.5, 135mm f2.5, Olympus 35RC, 2x Yashica FX2, Kodak Pocket Instamatic, Kodak Box Brownie

JAK

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 17:11
If you're using prime lenses you don't have much choice, it's when you need a different focal length lens on wherever you happen to be. You can't pop home from a vacation to swap lenses between shots in your special dust free lab!
Providing you're careful it isn't in reality much of an issue. Obviously avoid a sandy beach on a windy day or a dusty environment. I've seen many SLRs and DSLRs sitting without lenses or body caps on at camera fayres and in shops. Not ideal maybe but it shouldn't be a problem just to swap over a lens when you need to wherever you are (within reason.).
John K
Last Edited by JAK on 15/11/2016 - 17:14

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bwlchmawr

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 17:33
Dirty sensors are a fact of digital life.

Changing lenses with the camera pointing down helps and having everything laid out ready with the rear elements exposed for as short a time as possible. I never change lenses out of doors. I choose a lens for the day and just stick with it. I know this wouldn't suit many people.

My K5 has had a Tamron 17-50 2.8 attached since I bought them both and it STILL has a sensor mark!

Unless you're confident about cleaning the sensor (and I'm not) you just have to accept the odd mark (or in the case of my old DSLRs) lots of marks and just clone them out each time.

Strange, my little Canon EOS M doesn't have any marks and I'm always changing the lenses on it. Just luck and chance, I suppose.
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Cayman

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 18:03
As has been said dirty sensors are a fact of digital life.

I change lenses outdoors all the time and tend to carry a rocket blower with me. Very occasionally I get sensor spots but cleaning a sensor is actually very easy and I have never damaged one. See YouTube for guidance.

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RobL

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 18:17
Cleaning the sensor is not so bad with the Pentax kit as long as you can stop your hand shaking! I have managed this a couple of times with the K50. When changing lenses if possible I do it in the car or under shelter as the wind will blow in dust, and keep the body pointing down. First loosen the lens cap of the new lens so that it can be whipped onto the old lens quickly to leave it exposed as little as possible, as dust on the lens can transfer into the body.

My favourite gripe is I don't understand why bodies don't have a protective iris just inside the lens mount and which covers the opening when a lens is removed. Putting on a lens would open up the iris and a menu control could open it for cleaning. Cheap pocket cameras have them on the front of their lenses so must be possible.

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JAK

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 18:34
As far as I know DSLR sensors are normally covered by a mechanical shutter similar to film SLRs so shouldn't easily get grot on them! No more than a film would.
I suppose because the sensor is more exposed when using live view there is more chance of it picking up foreign objects that happen to have ingressed into the camera during a lens change. I've never experienced a problem so far, even with my K-01 or 'Q' which are live view only.
If it is anticipated using the camera out to sea (say) in bad conditions or on a rainy day probably best to stick to a WR zoom and not change it unnecessarily.
John K
Last Edited by JAK on 15/11/2016 - 18:40

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Gwyn

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 20:15
I change lenses as needed, no matter where. I try and keep the body pointing down, but it doesn't always work out. I only have one body so have no choice. One body and a spare lens or two is more than enough to lug.
I actually had to dig out the Arctic Butterfly and clean the sensor a couple of weeks ago, for the first time in an age. The Pentax sensor dust removal system as come on in leaps and bounds so I rarely have to clean now.

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vic cross

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 20:21
Back in the day when I had *istD and then K10 and they had the great vroom boom boom shake on the sensor I had a few dust spots from time to time. These were easy to clean with a swab and the correct liquid. However since I had the k5ii and now the K3 and K3ii with the silent high frequency shake on the sensor I've never had to clean them. The old *istD was with me on the Mara for a week in 2005 and lenses were changed very often but by being careful I got very little dust in it.
So the morel of this story is. "BE CAREFUL WHEN CHANGING LENSES"
CHEERS Vic.
Born again biker with lots of Pentax bits. Every day I wake up is a good day. I'm so old I don't even buy green bananas.

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sportyman531

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 22:16
bwlchmawr wrote:
Dirty sensors are a fact of digital life.

Changing lenses with the camera pointing down helps and having everything laid out ready with the rear elements exposed for as short a time as possible. I never change lenses out of doors. I choose a lens for the day and just stick with it. I know this wouldn't suit many people.

My K5 has had a Tamron 17-50 2.8 attached since I bought them both and it STILL has a sensor mark!

Unless you're confident about cleaning the sensor (and I'm not) you just have to accept the odd mark (or in the case of my old DSLRs) lots of marks and just clone them out each time.

Strange, my little Canon EOS M doesn't have any marks and I'm always changing the lenses on it. Just luck and chance, I suppose.

I have been using two K5's, one with a Tamron 17-50 f2.8 and the other with a Pentax 55-300 and I can cover anything with that combination but I am trying a prime lens and maybe I will get another...!
flickr ID: SteveW46243 or sw46246
DA AL 35mm f2.4, K3,18-135 WR, DA 55-300, Pentax KX, K5 x 2, 18-50 50-200 kit lenses, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Fuji X10, 2x Mamiya 1000s 2x 80mm f2.8, 150mm f3.5, 210mm f4, Yashica 124G TLR, 2x Yashica FX3 Super 2000, Tamron 28mm f2.8, 90mm SP f2.5, 135mm f2.5, Olympus 35RC, 2x Yashica FX2, Kodak Pocket Instamatic, Kodak Box Brownie

sportyman531

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 22:22
Cayman wrote:
As has been said dirty sensors are a fact of digital life.

I change lenses outdoors all the time and tend to carry a rocket blower with me. Very occasionally I get sensor spots but cleaning a sensor is actually very easy and I have never damaged one. See YouTube for guidance.

Looks like I will be getting a rocket blower! I will look on You Tube re sensor cleaning, thanks for the tips.
flickr ID: SteveW46243 or sw46246
DA AL 35mm f2.4, K3,18-135 WR, DA 55-300, Pentax KX, K5 x 2, 18-50 50-200 kit lenses, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Fuji X10, 2x Mamiya 1000s 2x 80mm f2.8, 150mm f3.5, 210mm f4, Yashica 124G TLR, 2x Yashica FX3 Super 2000, Tamron 28mm f2.8, 90mm SP f2.5, 135mm f2.5, Olympus 35RC, 2x Yashica FX2, Kodak Pocket Instamatic, Kodak Box Brownie
Last Edited by sportyman531 on 15/11/2016 - 22:22

sportyman531

Link Posted 15/11/2016 - 22:24
thanks for all the replies everyone, (has a sharp intake of breath) here goes!
flickr ID: SteveW46243 or sw46246
DA AL 35mm f2.4, K3,18-135 WR, DA 55-300, Pentax KX, K5 x 2, 18-50 50-200 kit lenses, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Fuji X10, 2x Mamiya 1000s 2x 80mm f2.8, 150mm f3.5, 210mm f4, Yashica 124G TLR, 2x Yashica FX3 Super 2000, Tamron 28mm f2.8, 90mm SP f2.5, 135mm f2.5, Olympus 35RC, 2x Yashica FX2, Kodak Pocket Instamatic, Kodak Box Brownie

davidwozhere

Link Posted 16/11/2016 - 02:07
You can't beat a rocket blower. I have a lengthy discipline of blast everything before taking a lens off, blast the new lens and its rear cap, then place the cap on top of it. Remove the old one. Blast it and its rear cap - put the cap on. Hold the camera facing down rock it from left to right while blowing, rock it front to back and through both diagonals, blasting all the way. Put the new lens on quickly. It's overkill but it keeps things clean.
Both the *istDS and the K5 are incurably addicted to old glass

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McGregNi

Link Posted 16/11/2016 - 08:23
Sounds good. I believe it is not recommended to blow inside a camera, but that lens blowing routine may well keep away some dirt and dust.

As I see it, surely, the entire purpose, the reason to exist, it's whole point in life, of a DSLR is to change lenses, and to change them whenever the photo you want demands it.
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sportyman531

Link Posted 16/11/2016 - 09:29
Thanks for the advice David and Neil.
I am proceeding with caution which is always a prudent approach! I changed a couple of lenses last night, the first change took rather longer than I would have liked as it was fiddly. I am now going to check for dust on the sensors and if any is present I will try the in camera dust removal function, more than once if necessary. At the moment I don't have a rocket blower but I'm going to get one. I think I would use it only if dust was showing on a sensor and the ultrasonic removal wasn't shifting it.
My first DSLR was a KX which I still have and as it came with two kit lenses I did swop them and outdoors too if necessary. This did lead to there being some dust on the sensor but, strangely, when I checked it last week for the first time in ages the marks had disappeared without any intervention by me.
I think I would only use a rocket blower if dust was actually showing on the sensor check and then only enough to remove it. I would have thought that liberally blowing everything would stir up any dust and create more problems.
Anyway, my recently acquired 35mm f2.4 is ready for a test run on my K3!
flickr ID: SteveW46243 or sw46246
DA AL 35mm f2.4, K3,18-135 WR, DA 55-300, Pentax KX, K5 x 2, 18-50 50-200 kit lenses, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Fuji X10, 2x Mamiya 1000s 2x 80mm f2.8, 150mm f3.5, 210mm f4, Yashica 124G TLR, 2x Yashica FX3 Super 2000, Tamron 28mm f2.8, 90mm SP f2.5, 135mm f2.5, Olympus 35RC, 2x Yashica FX2, Kodak Pocket Instamatic, Kodak Box Brownie

Carol8345

Link Posted 16/11/2016 - 11:54
I change lenses quite a bit while photographing the city. Occasionally I get dust and clone them out. But as they say, I keep my rocket blower in my bag. Unfortunately, I don't always see it until I get home and load the photos on the pc.
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